Sometimes I can’t get certain songs out of my head.

Sometimes because it’s amazing and deserves to be stuck on loop. Like the arpeggiated guitar part to I Want You (She’s So Heavy). An exquisite loop.

Sometimes because it’s been played everywhere I go and I can’ escape it.

Sometimes I have no explanation. Like why is Dog and Butterfly currently occupying prime real estate between my ears? I never liked Heart. This is an insult to brains everywhere.


String Survey


I started writing a string quartet in April, now there’s 4 of of them bugging me to complete them and set them free.

I haven’t a clue how long they should be and there’s a bunch of string techniques I am also clueless about. If you care to listen and give me feedback I would appreciate it.

These are in the order I wrote them.

Bow Down To Her On Sunday



I went to Winnipeg a couple months ago to help my mother sift through things she wanted to get rid of, accumulated paraphernalia, she wanted to pair down. Among the things she discarded were paintings and sketches. When I realized this I thought about preserving it since I love a lot of her work but when I got to the room I found she already destroyed much of what she wanted removed; ripped in half.

She also made a pile of work she was keeping many of which I never saw before and they were awesome. I realized she has stuff she’s attached to and stuff she isn’t and so do I. I don’t want anyone to hear songs that I haven’t finished or read lyrics I didn’t like that were in notebooks.

Salt’ n Pepa kind of summed up this point better than me 20 years ago

So I took her pile of ripped up paintings to the garbage dump which leads me to Shostakovich.

Can you imagine?! If you go to his wikipedia-

In 2004, the musicologist Olga Digonskaya discovered a trove of Shostakovich manuscripts at the Glinka State Central Museum of Musical Culture, Moscow. In a cardboard file were some “300 pages of musical sketches, pieces and scores” in the hand of Shostakovich. “A composer friend bribed Shostakovich’s housemaid to regularly deliver the contents of Shostakovich’s office waste bin to him, instead of taking it to the garbage. Some of those cast-offs eventually found their way into the Glinka. … The Glinka archive ‘contained a huge number of pieces and compositions which were completely unknown or could be traced quite indirectly,’ Digonskaya said.”


Due to a composer “friend”? What an asshole. Let’s take a moment to listen to one of the kings  of string quartets.